Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorA'raj, Salah-Eddinen
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-26T02:03:44Z
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1567
dc.description.abstractIn this study, conservation biological control principles were explored to determine whether the efficacy of Aphidius ervi Haliday (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitoid of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris (Homoptera: Aphididae) would be reduced in the presence of the hyperparasitoid Dendrocerus aphidum Rondani (Hymenoptera: Megaspilidae) interacting with floral resource subsidies. Four flowering plant species were selected for laboratory experiments to assess the best plant species to increase the longevity and fecundity of A. ervi and D. aphidum. Buckwheat (F agopyrum esculentum Moench cv. Katowase), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L. cv. Slowbolt), alyssum (Lobularia maritima L. cv. Carpet of Snow) and phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia Bentham cv. Balo) significantly increased the longevity and fecundity of A. ervi and the hyperparasitoid D. aphidum. Also, the idiobiont ecto-hyperparasitoid Asaphes vulgaris Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), the koinobiont endo-hyperparasitoids Alloxysta victrix Westwood (Hymenoptera: Charipidae), Syrphophagus aphidivorus Mayr (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) and Phaenoglyphis villosa Hartig (Hymenoptera: Charipidae) all used buckwheat nectar and this increased their longevity. Longevity of the parasitoid and the hyperparasitoids was significantly increased by buckwheat compared with other flowering plants. Buckwheat was deployed in field cages to assess percentage parasitism, percentage hyperparasitism and aphid density. The highest percentage parasitism and hyperparasitism occurred in cages containing buckwheat. The aphid density was lowest in field cages containing buckwheat. The behaviour of fed and unfed A. ervi and D. aphidum in the laboratory was studied to determine if searching behaviour could be enhanced after nectar feeding. A. ervi and D. Aphidum spent a considerable time displaying characteristic behaviours related to active searching when buckwheat flowers were provided. This suggests that well-fed parasitoids and hyperparasitoids search actively for hosts once they have had nectar access.en
dc.format.extent1-98en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectbiological controlen
dc.subjectlongevityen
dc.subjectAcyrthosiphon pisumen
dc.subjectAphidius ervien
dc.subjectDendrocerus aphidumen
dc.subjectFagopyrum esculentumen
dc.subjectPhacelia tanacetifoliaen
dc.subjectLobularia maritimaen
dc.subjectCoriandrum sativumen
dc.subjectfloral nectarsen
dc.subjectresource subsidiesen
dc.subjecttrophic cascadesen
dc.subjecttrophic levelsen
dc.titleThe role of floral resource subsidies in structuring a four tropic-level parasitoid/host systemen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300300 Horticulture::300303 Plant protection (pests, diseases and weeds)en
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::270000 Biological Sciences::270400 Botany::270403 Plant pathologyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::270000 Biological Sciences::270300 Microbiology::270307 Microbial ecologyen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitBio-Protection and Ecologyen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/BPEC
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.publisher.placeChristchurchen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record