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dc.contributor.authorKrisnayanti, Dewi
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-07T23:45:11Z
dc.date.available2010-04-07T23:45:11Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1598
dc.description.abstractA sustainable approach to restoration of the post-mining landscape involves creating conditions where a viable growth medium can be established with the minimal amount of fertiliser inputs over a period of time. Ideally, this growth medium should comprise a combination of minerals, organic matter, and biological components with have the capacity to retain and release nutrients over time. When combined with a re-vegetation scheme appropriate to the biogeographic area, a self-sustaining ecosystem can be established. Regulatory requirements for mine restoration typically require the use of topsoil, which is often in limited supply. However, overburden is commonly present in vast quantities and has the potential to be used as a restoration substrate with appropriate amendments. There are significant gaps in our understanding of factors relating to the use and amendment of overburden as a growing medium. The main objective of this study was to investigate and quantify the effects of inorganic and organic amendments and weathering on nutrient availability and plant growth in topsoil and overburden material obtained from the OceanaGold Globe Progress mine at Reefton, New Zealand. A series of glasshouse experiments were carried out on topsoil, fresh overburden and mullock (old waste rock) amended with biosolids, green manure, sawdust, lime and mineral fertiliser nutrients (nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)). R esults demonstrated that 300 kg N ha⁻¹ was sufficient to overcome N deficiency in topsoil, while 100 kg P ha⁻¹ was required to overcome P deficiency. Addition of biosolids to topsoil and overburden increased plant biomass production, without increasing heavy metal concentrations. Amendment of overburden significantly affected weathering rates by accelerating the formation of secondary minerals. In particular, lupin green manure accelerated the formation of organic iron (Fe) and aluminium (Al) organic complexes, resulting from the decomposition of the green manure and release of Fe from primary minerals. Results revealed that wineberry and red beech required 200 kg N ha⁻¹ for optimum growth. Overall, the findings of this research identified key parameters for effective utilisation of overburden as a restoration substrate. A sustainable restoration method for managing the topsoil and/or any overburden or waste rock material remaining at mine sites can be achieved by careful selection of organic amendments and allowing an initial weathering period.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectmetal availabilityen
dc.subjectnutrient availabilityen
dc.subjectweatheringen
dc.subjectred beech (Nothofagus fusca)en
dc.subjectwineberry (Aristotelia serrata)en
dc.subjectlupin (Lupinus angustifolius)en
dc.titleSustainable restoration of mine sitesen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciencesen
lu.thesis.supervisorSmith, Carol
lu.thesis.supervisorReichman, Suzie
lu.thesis.supervisorCondron, Leo
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Soil and Physical Sciencesen


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