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dc.contributor.authorMason, Susan L.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-27T01:56:00Z
dc.date.issued1991en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1756
dc.description.abstractThis thesis describes two approaches for studying of lipoprotein metabolism in sheep. The first approach involves the assay of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity to determine the role of lipoprotein-triacylglycerol fatty acids in fat deposition in sheep. This enzyme is the rate limiting enzyme in the hydrolysis of fatty acids from lipoprotein-triacylglycerol. The second approach was to characterize and quantify in vivo lipoprotein metabolism using iodinated very low density lipoprotein (¹²⁵I-VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (¹³¹I-LDL). Cross-bred lambs were divided into two treatment groups and either weaned early at 5 weeks of age or remained suckling. Lambs were slaughtered at 12 or 23 weeks at which time the body composition and adipose tissue LPL activity were determined. The differences in rearing led to differences in body composition. The suckled lambs were larger and fatter than weaned lambs. The increased fatness in the suckled lambs was associated with increased LPL activity (U/mg protein) in subcutaneous adipose tissue and was reflected in higher LPL activity in post-heparin plasma (PHP) taken 2 days prior to slaughter. The role of insulin in the regulation of LPL activity was investigated by either infusing a subset of the weaned and suckled lambs with insulin for 7 or 18 weeks or using the euglycemic clamp technique to study the effect of short insulin infusions. The long term infusion of insulin had no significant effect on PHP LPL or on adipose tissue LPL (U/g tissue). However, after infusing insulin for 6h at 6.3 mU.kg⁻·⁷⁵.h⁻¹ during the euglycemic clamps, a two fold increase in LPL activity in biopsied subcutaneous adipose tissue was observed. In the second approach, in vivo lipoprotein metabolism was investigated in 4 lambs using apolipoprotein B as a marker. Following the simultaneous injection of ¹²⁵I VLDL and ¹³¹I VLDL, the specific activities of apoB in VLDL, IDL and LDL fractions were determined. ApoB specific activity curves demonstrated that VLDL is metabolised to IDL and subsequently to LDL. The turnover of VLDL-B (3.45mg.d⁻¹.kg⁻¹) and LDL-B (4.8mg.d⁻¹.kg⁻¹) was calculated by fitting the VLDL-¹²⁵I-B and LDL-¹³¹I-B specific activity data to a mono-exponential equation. The metabolism of lipoproteins, inferred from the study of apoB, was shown to be similar in sheep to that reported in other animals although the amount of lipoprotein synthesised was low. A model to describe the kinetics of apoB metabolism in sheep was developed using SAAM. The proposed model features a three pool delipidation chain for VLDL, and subsystems containing two pools for IDL and LDL. IDL may be catabolised to LDL or cleared directly from the plasma. The developed model can now be used to compare the metabolism of lipoproteins in different physiological states and to design new experiments to study lipoprotein metabolism further.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectsheepen
dc.subjectlipoproteinen
dc.subjectapolipoprotein B metabolismen
dc.subjectlipoprotein lipaseen
dc.subjectkineticsen
dc.subjectbody compositionen
dc.subjectinsulinen
dc.titleMetabolism of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins in sheepen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300400 Animal Production::300406 Animal growth and developmenten
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::270000 Biological Sciences::270600 Physiologyen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Wine, Food and Molecular Biosciencesen
lu.contributor.unitResearch Management Officeen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff groupen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/WFMB
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff group
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-4959-1932


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