Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorScott, R. R.
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-14T01:25:58Z
dc.date.available2010-05-14T01:25:58Z
dc.date.issued1975
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1861
dc.description.abstractThe study covered the period August 1971 to February 1975 and was conducted in three blackcurrant plots. One plot comprised mature bushes that were pruned but not sprayed during the course of the study; the other two plots were subject to full normal managerial practices including spraying. Information on various aspects of the biology was revealed and this clarified some of the areas about which little was known previously especially for the Southern Hemisphere. Fecundity is 100 eggs per female, fertility in the field is at least 97% and predation of eggs is always less than 5%. There are six larval instars. Fungi of the genera Beauveria and Cordyceps cause up to 10% mortality of the larvae. This is the first record of the latter genus infecting S. tipuliformis. A sampling plan was developed to enable estimates of the population of S. tipuliformis at various stages to be obtained. This gave information on the distribution of stages of the life cycle within the canes according to the age of the wood. These samples also permitted the construction of life tables for three generations of S. tipuliformis in one plot and one generation in the others. Replication both in space and time was therefore achieved and the results were further replicated by considering each plot as nine separate blocks. The dispersion of the egg and larval stages was tested and found to fit the negative binomial model. A common k, kc, was calculated for the egg stage and the larval c stage. Though not vital to this present study various transformations of the raw data were investigated to see which were most appropriate in order to stabilise the variance for analyses in which such suitability is vital. The logarithmic transformation based on the k parameter of the k negative model [log (x + k/2)) was the most successful. The mortality of the eggs was quite low but a significant proportion of the emerging larvae fail to colonise the pith of a cane. This mortality is density dependent. Other mortalities including winter pruning are density independent or random. The key stage of the life cycle revealed by the life tables is the adult survival. This survival and the consequent population trend index determined from the number of eggs laid was found to be affected by the prevailing weather during the flight period especially during the last week of November and the first two weeks of December.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectcurrent clearwingen
dc.subjectSynanthedon tipuliformisen
dc.subjectblackcurrantsen
dc.subjectRibes nigrum L.en
dc.subjectpruningen
dc.subjectinfestationen
dc.subjectpith-boringen
dc.subjectsamplingen
dc.subjectpopulation dynamicsen
dc.titleA study of the biology and population dynamics of Synanthedon tipuliformis (Clerck) (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) in Canterbury, New Zealanden
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300300 Horticulture::300303 Plant protection (pests, diseases and weeds)en
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::270000 Biological Sciences::270500 Zoology::270504 Invertebrate biologyen
lu.thesis.supervisorHarrison, R. A.
lu.thesis.supervisorPenman, D. R.
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Ecologyen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail
Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record