Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMarchand Abal, Nicolasen
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-26T21:39:23Z
dc.date.issued2006en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1952
dc.description.abstractOver the last fifty years, environmental management thinking has been moving from the traditional 'balance of nature' and 'command and control' perspectives towards an evolving paradigm that explicitly recognises the environment as a complex adaptive system. Implicit in this new conception are the recognition that our understanding will never be complete; an inclusion of the human component as part of environmental systems; and the need for a greater integration of disciplines and knowledge for management. However, the actual uptake of this integration has been slow. Riparian areas are complex interfaces between terrestrial and aquatic environments and their sound management provides great opportunities to mitigate the impact of catchment activities on the ecological health and water quality of streams and rivers. However, the functions of riparian zones vary spatially within catchments. Moreover, local goals and perceptions as well as institutional arrangements for their management may also differ. This study focuses on integrated riparian management. By adopting an interdisciplinary and multi-stage approach to address the management of these areas, this research contributes to the shortfall of integrated (ecological-social) environmental management initiatives. The settings for this study are two distinctive catchments in New Zealand's South Island. Riparian areas along these case studies were firstly approached from a biophysical perspective determining the variability of different riparian functions along the river network. Secondly, this information was used to inform different riparian management options for different sections of the study rivers. These proposals were then discussed with a wide variety of stakeholders implicated in the management of the case studies' riparian areas. This research found: (a) different potentialities for improving different riparian functions along the networks of both case studies; (b) a way to interpret and represent biophysical information in a way that stakeholders can relate to and consider for implementation; (c) a way to obtain feedback from stakeholders (blending both quantitative and qualitative social scientific approaches) towards management options that reflect their needs and aspirations; and (d) high levels of acceptance for riparian management improvements amongst the majority of landowners. The image for riparian management that emerges from this study is one of a hybrid nature reflecting the importance of biophysical components together with careful consideration of social context including institutional arrangements for environmental management. The discussion and conclusion section of this thesis draws attention to the contribution that this study makes to integrated approaches for environmental management, not only for addressing the management of riparian areas but also wider environmental issues.en
dc.format.extent1-240en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectunderstandingen
dc.subjectriparian managementen
dc.subjectintegrated environmental managementen
dc.subjectbiophysical/social componentsen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectcase studyen
dc.subjecttoolen
dc.subjectquantitativeen
dc.subjectqualitativeen
dc.subjectriparian functionsen
dc.titleRiparian management: an exploration into connecting the biophysical and social sciencesen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/ENVIRONMANen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/ENVIRONMAN
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.publisher.placeChristchurchen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record