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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Simon
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-14T04:44:27Z
dc.date.available2010-07-14T04:44:27Z
dc.date.issued1996
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2242
dc.description.abstractThis report aims to address problems associated with the conventional site specific approach used to manage ecological restoration in Canterbury. As recent Agenda 21 initiatives demonstrate, management of restoration projects in isolation from one another is beginning to change. This report describes the complex environment affecting restorative activities, it outlines and illustrates a methodology to encourage and coordinate the initiative shown by Agenda 21 and other groups in Canterbury. Restoration assumes sustainable ecosystem function follows the introduction of appropriate species in appropriate quantities and places. The theory of ecological restoration applies scientific understanding of ecosystems to the value judgements involved in the art of restoration. Restoration efforts planned and implemented specifically as experiments designed to disclose how ecological system processes function implies replicas, controls, and clearly defined hypotheses. However, ecological restoration theory does not incorporate other important influences on the ecological success of restoration. An understanding of the restoration context demonstrates the need for integrative management of restoration. Ecological restoration requires management or manipulation and control of social, cultural, political, economic as well as ecological processes. Factors identified establish criteria for implementing and monitoring ecological restoration projects. This involves a move away from the traditional view of restoration as a site-by-site activity. The complex combined interaction of ecological, economic, social and cultural factors influence the popular success of ecological restoration. In the report, a sketch is used to illustrate ecological restoration theory. It is modified to illustrate an integrative management approach to ecological restoration projects. In this way, an alternative approach to restoration management is outlined. Restoration is a key tool for ensuring integrated land management. Ecological restoration method and theory develop sustainable land management practices. In this way, restorationists pragmatically apply the purpose and principles of the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA s:5-8). The objective of directing further research based on the framework outlined by this report is the development of a meta-theory for Integrated Environmental Management (IEM). Ecological restoration objectives benefit from IEM methodology, the use of systems theory principles, and a metapolicy perspective.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectrestoration ecologyen
dc.subjectsustainable ecosystemsen
dc.subjectecological restorationen
dc.subjectResource Management Act 1991en
dc.subjectintegrated managementen
dc.subjectCanterburyen
dc.titleRestoration ecology in Canterbury: developing an integrated management approachen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorMontgomery, Roy
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc0602 Ecologyen


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