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dc.contributor.authorTaylor, C. N.
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-15T23:30:16Z
dc.date.available2010-07-15T23:30:16Z
dc.date.issued1974
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2254
dc.description.abstractThe text describe the Lake Ellesmere ecosystem with special regard to the influence of' the lake's ecology on the attitudes of the various social groups who use the lake's resources. Attitudes to the major problems of resource management in the Lake Ellesmere system are described for all the important interest-groups. These problems centre around the control of eutrophication, the management of fish and bird populations, and the establishment of' a suitable lake level, including the control and timing of the outlet to the sea. This study concentrated on the opinions and knowledge of interest-group leaders, administrators and scientific workers involved with the lake. Opinions and ideas were sought from all these 'primary actors' in resource management of the lake. It was found that ideas varied considerably among these people as to the use of the lake environment and physical and biological problems associated with this use. Gaps in knowledge were often found to be filled by myths which were peculiar to particular groups. The study demonstrated a need for better communication between and within interest-groups, administrators and technical people. More definitive research is required to provide suitable information for such communication. It is suggested that the present management system should be revised with a view to co-ordinating and improving its operation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectLake Ellesmereen
dc.subjectecosystemen
dc.subjectecologyen
dc.subjectresource managementen
dc.subjectuser-group conflictsen
dc.subjectinteractionsen
dc.subjectresource management decision-makingen
dc.titleCulture and ecology in the Lake Ellesmere ecosystem : a study of the origins and interactions of user-group conflictsen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of New Zealanden
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorWillmott
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc050209 Natural Resource Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050102 Ecosystem Functionen


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