Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcBean, Catriona L.
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-10T02:21:08Z
dc.date.available2010-08-10T02:21:08Z
dc.date.issued1992
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2370
dc.description.abstractThis thesis traces the evolution of the ranger in New Zealand's protected natural resource management from 1874-1987. Rangers were employed by three government departments - the Department of Lands and Survey, the New Zealand Forest Service, and the Wildlife Service, Department of Internal Affairs - at the operational level of protected natural resource management for over a century. Six types of rangers, from the three departments, were identified; forest ranger, environmental forest ranger, crown land ranger, national park ranger, reserves ranger, and wildlife ranger. Archival data provided official information over the last 113 years. Interviews were conducted with former rangers from the three departments, (from a spectrum of positions of responsibility), and provided data on personal experiences, perceptions and attitudes towards protected natural resource management. Stinchcombe's historicist explanation provided a theoretical perspective based upon two assumptions; the phenomenon is produced by a system of constant causes, and some social patterns cause their own reproduction. Historicist explanation can be used as a means to understanding and explaining social phenomenon. The evolution of the ranger was seen as a self replicating phenomenon. Analysis of the evolution of the ranger highlighted six categories seen to influence ranger duties and responsibilities. These included the environmental, governmental, departmental policies, public pressure, key individuals, and other rangers and institutions. 'Meanings' of the New Zealand ranger were analysed. Meanings are considered both in terms of ranger duties and responsibilities, and meanings ascribed by those involved in protected natural resource management. Three distinct periods in the evolution of the ranger are identified; protection, control and management. These three represent changes in ranger duties and responsibilities, and management techniques.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectrangeren
dc.subjecthistoryen
dc.subjectprotected natural resource managementen
dc.subjectNew Zealand Forest Serviceen
dc.subjectDepartment of Lands and Surveyen
dc.subjectWildlife Serviceen
dc.subjectDepartment of Internal Affairsen
dc.subjectmeaningsen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectDepartment of Conservation (DOC)en
dc.titleRanger : the evolution of the role of a protected natural resource manageren
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Parks and Recreation Managementen
lu.thesis.supervisorDevlin, Pat
lu.thesis.supervisorSimmons, David
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sporten
dc.subject.anzsrc050209 Natural Resource Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050211 Wildlife and Habitat Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc160507 Environment Policyen
dc.subject.anzsrc160802 Environmental Sociologyen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail
Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record