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dc.contributor.authorLucas, Diane J.
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-24T22:31:07Z
dc.date.available2010-11-24T22:31:07Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2850
dc.description.abstractThe study sought to develop a method for identifying areas of agreement among stakeholders as to acceptable and unacceptable vegetation change in the high country. The contentious issue of vegetation change in the high country has been explored through a case study survey. Accessing a wide array of stakeholders through a multi-round anonymous mail survey to minimise antagonism, participants were first invited to set the agenda by identifying past and expected vegetation change. To avoid the politics of place, a generic approach was taken. Based on land systems, images were generated and various vegetation change scenarios applied. Respondents judged these on their desirability, possibility, likelihood and sustainability. The survey succeeded in identifying agreement on the majority of the vegetation scenarios circulated as to their desirability or undesirability. Indigenous vegetation, particularly tussock lands, elicited the greatest agreement as to their desirability. No scenarios involved obvious land development or tree planting obtained any majority of support. The presence of wilding trees, and of geometric forest block, was judged undesirable by a majority. Thus, the method developed succeeded in identifying acceptable vegetation change for the high country. However, whilst seen as possible, such vegetation was generally judged to be unlikely. No scenarios have been found to be considered sustainable.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectlandscapeen
dc.subjecttussocken
dc.subjectvegetationen
dc.subjectforestryen
dc.subjectgrasslanden
dc.subjectexoticen
dc.subjectindigenousen
dc.subjectdevelopmenten
dc.subjectchangeen
dc.subjectmodellingen
dc.subjectgenericen
dc.subjectimagingen
dc.subjectagreementen
dc.subjectconsensusen
dc.subjectDelphien
dc.subjectconflicten
dc.subjectrepresentativeen
dc.titleIdentifying acceptable vegetation change in high country landscapesen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster in Landscape Architectureen
lu.thesis.supervisorSwaffield, Simon
lu.thesis.supervisorKirby, Val
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. en
dc.subject.anzsrc060203 Ecological Physiologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc0602 Ecologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc0703 Crop and Pasture Productionen


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