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dc.contributor.authorSimoes Lopes, Izabel Echenique
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-10T23:44:11Z
dc.date.available2012-09-10T23:44:11Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4895
dc.description.abstractThe monitor farms programme is an industry-funded extension methodology, which takes a whole farm approach, using a business view of farming. As such it is a worthy complement to the one-to-one consultancy. Financial surveys have indicated that this programme has been of measurable value to farmers. However, quantitative measures such as these do not explain how monitor farms aid farmers. Moreover, very little documented evidence exists on farmers' opinions of this programme. This study investigated issues relating to the operation and effectiveness of the monitor farm programme. The perspectives of facilitators, group members, and monitor farmers were gathered in a case study of two different monitor farm groups. The timing of the research coincided with the end of a first and start of a second monitor farm, which was considered appropriate for gaining an appreciation of how lessons learned with the operation of a complete monitor farm programme could be handed on to its succeeding one. The understanding of these issues can be a precursor to a more complete evaluation of this programme as an extension activity. The study has identified some issues considered to be important for a successful monitor farm operation. A good facilitator is seen as a major factor, and the membership of agribusiness professionals seems to be essential for the group. Small sub-groups analysing specific topics and then reporting back to the whole group were indicated as an effective way for conducting the discussions. There were other points which were seen with no consensus, such as the appropriate level of performance of the monitor farm, and its similarity to the group members farms. Reasons for farmers to take part in the community group, and the benefits participants enjoyed are also discussed. Finally, the monitor farms are analysed in comparison to another group extension methodology, the farmers' discussion groups.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectCanterburyen
dc.subjectfarm monitoringen
dc.subjectfarmers' groupsen
dc.subjectfarm managementen
dc.subjectfarm management consultantsen
dc.subjectbusiness planningen
dc.subjectperformance measurementen
dc.subjectextension methodologiesen
dc.subjectmonitor farms programmeen
dc.subjectagricultural extensionen
dc.subjectqualitative researchen
dc.subjectagribusiness professionalsen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.titleThe monitor farms programme : a case study in Canterburyen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorGow, Neil
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Management and Property Studiesen
dc.rights.accessRightsThis digital dissertation can only be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University.en
dc.subject.anzsrc070106 Farm Management, Rural Management and Agribusinessen
dc.subject.anzsrc070107 Farming Systems Researchen


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