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dc.contributor.authorMcClung, Rachel S.
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-26T21:01:54Z
dc.date.available2013-02-26T21:01:54Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5260
dc.description.abstractAs investment located on New Zealand floodplains increased and subsequently damaged by flooding, public pressure for new water control works mounted. This in turn led to calls for a more comprehensive and integrated approach to management (Ericksen 1990:51). In New Zealand, an integrated approach for reducing flood hazard has long been advocated through legislation (Ericksen 1990:50) and is today through the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA). Yet in spite of this, integrated management has been weakly adopted (Bührs 1991: 10 & 17; Ericksen 1990:50; Ericksen, Dixon & Berke 2000:123). Reasons for the slow progress made by local authorities in reducing flood hazards include a lack of resources and unwilling attitudes (Ericksen 1990:50). It was the belief amongst many local politicians, and other influential community members, that land use management would limit development and therefore rateable income for use in stimulating further growth. Similar activities caused advice from catchment boards to local authorities on floodplain planning to be compromised, even spurned (Ericksen 1990:50). This report focuses on management of the lower Waimkariri floodplain, providing a background to past management schemes and analysing present management. There are four local government authorities that have over-lapping responsibilities on the lower Waimakariri floodplain. They are Environment Canterbury (Ecan), Christchurch City Council (CCC), Waimakariri District Council (WDC) and Selwyn District Council (SDC). It has been established within this report that an integrated approach to management of the lower Waimakariri floodplain is the most efficient and effective approach because of the over-lapping responsibilities Ecan, CCC, WDC and SDC has. However, organisational culture and attitudes are preventing an integrated approach. In addition, currently there is no regional direction for management of the Waimakariri floodplain. The lack of regional direction makes it difficult for territorial local authorities to manage the floodplain consistency. It was found that management of the Waimakariri floodplain is not integrated, which reduces the overall effectiveness. The key recommendation in this report is that a joint committee consisting of representatives from Ecan, CCC, WDC and SDC be formed to address the lack of integration and to provide a regional direction for management of the Waimakariri floodplain.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectfloodplain managementen
dc.subjectintegrated environmental managementen
dc.subjectintegrated floodplain managementen
dc.subjectresource managementen
dc.subjectResource Management Acten
dc.subjectWaimakariri Riveren
dc.titleTowards integrated floodplain management in the lower Waimakariri floodplainen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorMemon, Ali
lu.contributor.unitCentre for Resource Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050206 Environmental Monitoringen


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