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dc.contributor.authorHamlen-Williams, David
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-03T03:13:50Z
dc.date.available2013-05-03T03:13:50Z
dc.date.issued1988
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5413
dc.description.abstractThe necessity to understand the social requirements of the client is fundamental in all design. Although particularly pertinent within the context of populated inner city spaces. It becomes integral in the public participate and user friendly climate of the present decade. In amongst criticism and scepticism of modern urban development, the present inquiry arises specifically from the authors belief that the success or otherwise of design (in the widest sense) is most measurable in terms of its effect on individual or group patterns of behaviour. A contention that follows on from a desire to explore the relationship between individuals and public urban spaces. And is stimulated by the eternal quest of designers to produce environments with predictable and positive outcomes. The difficulties imposed by time and resources prohibit the indepth research required for behavioural analysis. Emphasis instead is placed on understanding some of the basic principles underlying it, with particular attention being focussed on the concepts of perception and image formation (seeing). It is these mutual terms that are considered to be the process and product underpinning human behaviours. While no one body of knowledge, is fully applicable for this inquiry, with many of the thoughts expressed being my own, the principle sources drawn on are from Geography, Psychology, Social Anthropology and Environmental Studies. None are explicitly works on Landscape Architecture, although it is hoped that this discussion will prove fertile for such practioners and others involved in public design. Any conclusions or statements drawn in this paper are not seen as definitive, rather it is hoped to stimulate discussion towards a human design paradigm.en
dc.format51 leaves
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectdesignen
dc.subjecthumanen
dc.subjectperceptionen
dc.subjectcitiesen
dc.subjectbehaviouren
dc.subjecturban spaceen
dc.titleTowards a methodology of human design : the role of perception studies and image formation : [a dissertation] submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for a Diploma of Landscape Architecture [Lincoln College]en
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma of Landscape Architectureen
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen
dc.rights.accessRightsThis digital dissertation can be viewed only by current staff and students of Lincoln University.en
dc.subject.anzsrc120301 Design History and Theoryen
dc.subject.anzsrc120107 Landscape Architectureen


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