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dc.contributor.authorBailey, Steve
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-26T23:50:24Z
dc.date.available2014-06-26T23:50:24Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/6087
dc.descriptionThe New Zealand Kellogg Rural Leaders Programme develops emerging agribusiness leaders to help shape the future of New Zealand agribusiness and rural affairs. Lincoln University has been involved with this leaders programme since 1979 when it was launched with a grant from the Kellogg Foundation, USA.en
dc.description.abstractOver the years farmers within the Bay of Plenty had little problems or restrictions in accessing water for running their business. However times have changed and the diversification of our business into both dairy and horticulture has increased our requirements for water. The opportunity to diversify our dairy farm to include horticulture has been mirrored across many properties within the Bay of Plenty, and in particular within the Western Bay of Plenty. Fertile volcanic soil, high rainfall and relatively flat terrain, have encouraged the increased intensification of land use for horticulture and dairy. In addition, significant urban population growth over the last 10 years has seen water demand more than double over this period. Like so many industries throughout the country, farmers and orchardists within the Western Bay of Plenty find themselves becoming more accountable to government legislation and policies, and in particular the Resource Management Act (RMA). In 2001 Regional Councils were given power of general competence under the RMA, which gives them the authority to issue and police water consents. As the urban sprawl and industrial development increase so does competition for the resources. The Land and Water Forum is looking to come up with solutions for the nation as a whole and collaboratively. The Bay of Plenty has its own unique culture, geography demographics and it is to this point I look to identify how water users, in particular those in the district of the Western Bay of Plenty, could improve some of the issues they see as a concern going forward. So in a region with an abundance of water there is a sense that we are on the brink of a frantic water grab and what is the conversation between users and council?en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Faculty of Commerce. Kellogg Rural Leaders Programme.en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesKellogg Rural Leaders Programme reporten
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author.en
dc.subjectwater useen
dc.subjectBay of Plentyen
dc.subjectland intensificationen
dc.subjectwater demanden
dc.subjectResource Management Acten
dc.titleLocal water graben
dc.typeMonographen
lu.contributor.unitKellogg Rural Leadersen
dc.rights.accessRightsThis Kellogg Rural Leaders Programme report can be viewed only by current staff and students of Lincoln University.en
dc.subject.anzsrc050209 Natural Resource Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc0701 Agriculture, Land and Farm Managementen


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