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dc.contributor.authorDalziel, Paul C.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-21T03:27:26Z
dc.date.available2014-12-16en
dc.date.issued2015-02en
dc.identifier.citationDalziel, P. (2015). Regional skill ecosystems to assist young people making education employment linkages in transition from school to work. Local Economy, 30(1): 53-66. DOI:10.1177/0269094214562738en
dc.identifier.issn0269-0942en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/7145
dc.description.abstractA feature of regional development in New Zealand over the last two decades has been ongoing skill shortages reported by employers at the same time as unemployment has been relatively high. This paper addresses that issue with findings from a five-year trans-disciplinary research programme on education employment linkages for young people. The author’s contribution to that programme focused on employer-led channels at the regional level, investigating how employment opportunities and requirements in a region are communicated to young people as they make education choices. This paper pays particular attention to the role of career offices in post-school education institution, drawing on the skill ecosystem metaphor introduced initially by David Finegold in 1999 and developed more recently by the NSW Board of Vocational Education and Training in Australia in collaboration with a research team led by John Buchanan at the University of Sydney.en
dc.format.extent53-66en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSage Journalsen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Sage Journals - https://doi.org/10.1177/0269094214562738 - http://lec.sagepub.com/content/30/1/53.fullen
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1177/0269094214562738en
dc.rights© The Author.en
dc.subjectemploymenten
dc.subjectlabouren
dc.subjectregionalen
dc.subjectskillsen
dc.subjectskills eco-systemen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectUrban & Regional Planningen
dc.titleRegional skill ecosystems to assist young people making education employment linkages in transition from school to worken
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
lu.contributor.uniten
lu.contributor.uniten
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0269094214562738en
dc.subject.anzsrc1205 Urban and Regional Planningen
dc.subject.anzsrc1402 Applied Economicsen
dc.subject.anzsrc1604 Human Geographyen
dc.relation.isPartOfLocal Economyen
pubs.issue1en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agribusiness & Economics Research Unit
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff group
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://lec.sagepub.com/content/30/1/53.fullen
pubs.volume30en
dc.identifier.eissn1470-9325en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-1757-6888


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