Deposit Guidelines and FAQ

  1. About Research@Lincoln
    1. What is Research@Lincoln?
    2. What are the benefits of Research@Lincoln?
    3. What kinds of document can be included in Research@Lincoln?
    4. Who can add content to Research@Lincoln?
    5. Who can view content in Research@Lincoln?
  2. Depositing Research into Research@Lincoln
    1. How can I contribute my work?
    2. What file formats can I deposit?
    3. How can I convert my file to PDF?
    4. Is there a limit on how many items I can deposit?
    5. Is there a limit on the overall size of a collection?
    6. Is there a limit on file size?
    7. Can I delete a file after depositing it?
    8. Can I still link to my papers from my own web site?
  3. Copyright and Publication
    1. Do I retain copyright to my work in Research@Lincoln?
    2. Why do I need to agree to the Deposit Licence and what does it say?
    3. What rights do I grant the University when I deposit my work?
    4. May I deposit copies of published articles?
    5. Will posting preprints here compromise my chances of publication?
    6. How can I find out a publisher's deposit policy?
    7. Where can I get more information about copyright issues?
  4. About Open Access
    1. What is Open Access?

About Research@Lincoln

What is Research@Lincoln?

Research@Lincoln aims to collect in one place the research produced by members of Lincoln University. That is, it's an "institutional repository" - a platform for the collection, organisation, access, annotation and preservation of the University's research outputs in digital formats.

What are the benefits of Research@Lincoln?

By collecting the research output of the University into a single online space, we hope to achieve several benefits:

  • we'll know where to find all this research;
  • we'll know that it is safely backed up;
  • we'll have some hope of preserving it in the future, when file formats become obsolete.

In addition, because Research@Lincoln is indexed by OAIster, nzresearch.org.nz, Google, Google Scholar, and other search engines:

  • other people will be able to find the research too.

Because other researchers can find our research, they

  • will not waste time and money duplicating the research;
  • will be able to build on our research;
  • will be able to cite our research;

all of which:

  • increases exposure to the world of our research activities;
  • enhances the reputation of the University by making our research more widely accessible and visible;
  • boosts the potential impact of our research;
  • leads to increased citation of our research.

In addition, Research@Lincoln:

  • assists with reporting and auditing requirements (PBRF).

What kinds of document can be included in Research@Lincoln?

We will accept items associated with the research carried out by the University academic community. This includes materials such as:

  • journal articles (at the preprint or postprint stage)
  • book chapters
  • discussion papers
  • research reports
  • conference papers
  • theses
Other materials associated with research will be considered for deposit on a case-by-case basis, for example :
  • data sets
  • audio or video files
  • software

We have some general guidelines to help determine if a work is appropriate:

  • the work should be of a scholarly nature
  • the work must be created or sponsored by affiliated faculty or staff, or by academic or research units
  • the work should be completed and ready for distribution.

In addition, previously published items should have clearance from the copyright owner for inclusion in an institutional repository. This is covered in more detail in the section on Copyright and Publication.

Who can add content to Research@Lincoln?

Any member of the academic staff of Lincoln University, or affiliated bodies, or anyone undertaking research at the University, is welcome to add their research content to Research@Lincoln. See the next section for how to get involved.

Library, Teaching and Learning staff will also be adding content.

Who can view content in Research@Lincoln?

As a matter of principle, Research@Lincoln is an open access repository, meaning that anyone with access to the Internet may access, view and download content.

It is possible to restrict access to some content if required, for example for an embargo period or to authorised users only. It is advisable to deposit restricted items into Research@Lincoln for preservation, even if open access is not allowed. However, we would normally want to make a description of the item openly available, even if the full item is not. Contact us if you require more information on access restriction.

Depositing Research into Research@Lincoln

How can I contribute my work?

If you are a current Lincoln University staff member you should deposit via Symplectic Elements in the first instance. This system is integrated into Research@Lincoln so you only need to deposit in one place to manage both your papers on Research@Lincoln and your research portfolio for PBRF.

Otherwise, the first step is to Log in to Research@Lincoln, using your Lincoln network username and password. This automatically registers you as a Research@Lincoln user.

Once you have done this, contact us to explain which collection(s) you would like to deposit into, and perhaps a brief description of the type of material to be deposited. If it is a specific named series of reports, for example, we may need to create a collection for you.

We will then contact you when you are able to submit items, which you do by logging in and using the online submission form.

Submissions will be validated and approved by Library, Teaching and Learning staff before being made available through Research@Lincoln.

What file formats can I deposit?

Each collection may have particular guidelines about type of materials that are acceptable; for example, a thesis collection is intended just for theses and associated materials (e.g. data sets). Aside from collection restrictions, we can accept any file format that can be stored on your PC.

For presentation purposes, the Adobe Acrobat PDF format is best for textual materials, since the reader for PDF is freely available and widely used.

How can I convert my file to PDF?

We prefer that Adobe Acrobat be used for conversion, and have provided some guidelines for producing quality PDF files.

If you are likely to be converting many documents, you should consider purchasing a copy of Adobe Acrobat, which can be done through ITS.

For assistance with converting other file formats please contact us.

Is there a limit on how many items I can deposit?
Is there a limit on the overall size of the collection?

No. There is no limit on the number of items an individual can submit to Research@Lincoln, and there are no limits placed on the size of the collection.

Is there a limit on file size?

In theory, the system can handle any size file, but there are practical limitations deriving from network bandwidth and the capacity of a user to download your content to their desktop.

Since web-based submission requires that you upload files from your own desktop, this should not be a problem.

For files that are too large for you to practicably upload, (such as very large data sets or large audio or video files), please contact us.

Can I delete a file after depositing it?

Because Research@Lincoln is intended to provide for long-term, permanent access to research outputs, we strongly discourage removal of content from the system, and individual users are not authorised to remove items directly. However, there may be circumstances in which it is necessary to remove an item. In such cases, please contact Research@Lincoln staff and we will take the appropriate action.

The permanent URL of any withdrawn item will contain a record with the item's metadata, and a note indicating that the item has been withdrawn from view (please note the item will normally still exist in our database but will not be made available for viewing, downloading or searching). The item's metadata will not be searchable, nor made available to search engines, but will be displayed when a citation elsewhere links directly to the item.

Can I still link to my papers from my own web site?

Yes. Research@Lincoln can relieve you of maintenance chores for your files but you can still link to individual papers in Research@Lincoln from your personal or department web site.

Copyright and Publication

Do I retain copyright to my work in Research@Lincoln?

Yes, you retain any rights that you had prior to deposit. In the case of a published article where the publisher has granted special permission to you in order to deposit a paper, you will continue to retain those rights. We only require that you click on a Deposit Licence that grants us permission to make your work available, and confirms that you have the right to deposit it.

Why do I need to agree to the Deposit Licence and what does it say?

The Deposit Licence is an agreement between you and Lincoln University, allowing us to make the work available through Research@Lincoln, and to copy the item for preservation purposes. It is a LIMITED, NON-EXCLUSIVE agreement, meaning no copyright transfer occurs, and you retain all the rights you had before the item was deposited. The licence also asks you to confirm that you do indeed own the copyright on the item, and have the right to deposit it in Research@Lincoln.

Please note that if you have published the work elsewhere, your publishing agreement may limit your ability to deposit items in repositories such as Research@Lincoln.

What rights do I grant the University when I deposit my work?

You grant to Lincoln University the non-exclusive right to:

  • reproduce, translate (as defined below), and/or distribute your submission (including the metadata and abstract) worldwide, in any format or medium for non-commercial, academic purposes only.
  • translate the submission, without changing the content, to any medium or format, and keep more than one copy of your work for purposes of security, back up and preservation.

See the full text of the Deposit Licence for more information.

May I deposit copies of published articles?

Yes, but your agreement with the publisher must allow you to do so, or you must obtain permission from the publisher.

Most journal publishers do not permit depositing of the published version, so you will probably need to deposit either a pre-print (draft before refereeing) or post-print (final draft after refereeing) version.

Will posting preprints here compromise my chances of publication?

Many journal publishers now recognise the importance of "self-archiving" of your work in a local "institutional repository", and allow you to do so. It is important when signing publisher agreements to bear this in mind.

For information on protecting your rights to your intellectual property, go to http://www.sparc.arl.org/resources/authors/addendum.

How can I find out a publisher's deposit policy?

Most publishers are happy for authors to "self-archive" copies of their papers in their institution's repository.

For a list of publishers' policies regarding the authors rights to publish pre-prints and post-prints in a repository such as Research@Lincoln, go to www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo.php. Or you can check your journal or publisher's policy using the forms below:

Search by journal:

Search by publisher:

Where can I get more information about copyright issues?

For more information about copyright, contact us.

About Open Access

What is Open Access?

The open access movement is about using the Web to open the research literature of the world to any user wishing to access it, for free. All that is needed is access to the Internet, and enough bandwidth to download the document.

The benefits of this approach are that:

  1. publicly funded research is made publicly available
  2. researchers will be able to access and use all the literature, rather than just what appears in the journals that their institution can afford. Open Access means that usage and citations will be based on what research is best and most pertinent, not just what is affordable
  3. researchers will gain an increase in citations to high quality work, wherever it is published (a piece of research hidden in either an obscure or an expensive journal is not likely to be cited today). Research shows a 50% to 250% increase in citations when documents are made freely accessible online.

Where can I find out more about Open Access?

More information about Open Access and Lincoln University's open access policy is on the Library, Teaching and Learning site.

This page has been based on the FAQ for Adelaide Research & Scholarship, University of Adelaide, with thanks.