Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEspie, Peter Ross
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-10T00:39:52Z
dc.date.available2020-01-10T00:39:52Z
dc.date.issued1976
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/11273
dc.descriptionMissing pages 73,87 and 94
dc.description.abstractGame animals have long been one of the most controversial recreational issues in New Zealand. Classified as "noxious" by the Noxious Animals Act (1956), the dominant policy of the controlling authority, the New Zealand Forest Service, has been one of control by extreme reduction. However, some bodies, notably the New Zealand Deerstalkers Association (NZDA) have opposed this as a blanket policy. In the last decade there has been considerable change in control of game animals, principally though commercial game meat recovery. In 1974 the Government formed a Caucus Committee to investigate 'Noxious Animal Control and Related Matters'. In the introduction to their report, that Committee stated, "We also believe it appropriate to recognise the social values of recreational hunting and make special provision for recreational hunting both as a factor in controlling noxious animals and as a sport in itself". This marked a turning point in attitude towards introduced animals and stimulated the NZDA to initiate research into the North Canterbury Chamois Herd with an ultimate view of game management for recreational hunting. The NZDA permit-hunting area in the Lewis Pass was chosen as the research area and the most important catchment, that of the Nina River, selected for study. The objective was to make a broad classification of chamois habitat and land use. The present study was aimed at fulfilling that objective using three inter-related approaches: 1. A habitat classification based on analysis of vegetation from bushline to alpine fellfield. Four sub-catchments were studied, the Lucretia, Devil skin, North and South Head basins of the Nina River. 2. A study of chamois habitat use by faecal pellet techniques. 3. A study of Chionochloa soil/plant/landscape relationships. There has been comparatively little work on chamois in New Zealand. Christie (1963, 1964, 1967) studied the ecology and niche of chamois in Cupola Basin, Nelson Lakes National Park, and current Forest Service research is centred in the Harper-Avoca headwaters, Rakaia Catchment, Canterbury. The project described here provides information for interjacent mountainous habitat.en
dc.format.extentii,131 pagesen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectchamoisen
dc.subjectfaecal pellet samplingen
dc.subjectgame animalsen
dc.subjectrecreational huntingen
dc.subjectLewis Passen
dc.titleClassification of the habitat and niche of chamois in the Nina Catchment, Lewis Pass: a dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Agricultural Science (Honours) in the University of Canterbury [Lincoln College]en
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelOtheren
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Agricultural Science (Honours)en
lu.thesis.supervisorDaly, G. T.
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only.en
dc.subject.anzsrc050211 Wildlife and Habitat Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record